Life in Dumaguete, Philippines

Life in Dumaguete, Philippines



This post is an update of my life in Dumaguete.

I’ve been living in Dumaguete for a month now and it’s going pretty good. I’ve settled into “work mode” and haven’t explored anywhere out of the city limits yet, but I’ll get to it after finished the project I’m on. Hopefully before the end of next month.

Life in Dumaguete

Well I’m basically just living. Working, cooking, reading, watching TV, and Anna (from Baybay) is here keeping me company.

I haven’t made any other friends – not that I’ve been trying. I’m one of those people that only needs one other person to get my fill of human interaction, and most times not even that.

Dumaguete Public Swimming Pool

Dumaguete has the biggest swimming pool on Negros island and it is only a ten minute walk from my apartment.

It’s a 50m pool and only costs 20php to enter.

I’ve discovered that late morning is the best time to go. Well, I haven’t tried early morning or the afternoon, but if you go before 11:00am there is often school groups. After that it’s pretty much empty. It closes for lunch at 1145am until 1pm.

Also, if you go there at that time there often isn’t anyone to collect the money so you get a free swim. Not that 20php is breaking the bank. At that price it’s practically free anyway!

I’ve been working on my underwater swimming lately. Trying to improve how fast and far I can go.

Life in Dumaguete - Swimming Pool - Survive Travel

A swimming carnival at the public pool. Usually there are much less people.

There is also a running track which you can use. I don’t know if there is an entry fee because I’ve never been there.

Running track in Dumaguete.

Dumaguete Public Library

I got Anna to become a member of the local library. It’s not very big but there is more than enough to keep me busy. I’ve been getting into Dan Brown (author of the Angels and Demons, The DaVinci Code, etc.)

Let’s Talk Food!

One of my favorite things when not traveling is being able to cook, and I’ve been cooking a lot whilst living life in Dumaguete – mostly because I’m a better cook than Anna.

Between the Dumaguete Public Market and the couple of supermarkets in town I can get all my favorite foods except one, blue-berries. But considering where I am that’s pretty good.

  • Fresh tofu. Can get it in Robinsons supermarket, but it is half the price in the pubic market.
  • Pure honey. Camiguin honey. 100% from Lee’s Plaza (or maybe it was Robinsons supermarket), or a little shop next to the immigration office.
  • Coconut Oil. 100% virgin, cold pressed coconut oil from Robinson’s, or a little shop next to the immigration office.
  • Coconut Water. Lee’s plaza.
  • Moringa. Fresh from the public market and all the supermarkets. Capsulated/powdered from the little shop next to the immigration office.
  • Red Rice. Can get it in the supermarkets but again, much cheaper in the public market.
  • Mungbean. Markets, supermarkets.
  • Kim Chi. Available in Robinsons supermarket, but fresher and cheaper from Soban Korean restaurant. Only 250php per kilo! And it is only a five minute walk from my apartment.
Life in Dumaguete - Local Eatery - Survive Travel

A local eatery in the Philippines.

Getting a Visa Extension in Dumaguete

I heard that Dumaguete was a small but fairly busy immigration office. It is small, but not that busy. I didn’t have to wait to be served. The form has been simplified since the last time I did it, but other than that it is the same process.

The immigration office is located down an “alley” of shops, just around the corner from Nova / Lee’s plaza. Head towards the ocean and turn right at the end of the block. Walk a couple of minutes and turn right down the alley when you see the sign to the immigration office, which is on your left.

Just before the immigration office on your right is a little shop with moringa, honey, soaps, imported meats, etc. Owned by a Canadian guy and (I think) his Filipina wife. Nice guy.

Life in Dumaguete - Immigration Office Alley - Survive Travel

The alley to the immigration office.

The process wasn’t instant like it was in Tacloban. I went in the morning and they said I could collect it at 3pm.




Got anything to add to this post of life in Dumaguete? Let us know them (or anything else you want to say) in the comments 😀 .

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